The Icy Embrace of Winter: Borell

February’s Blog Carnival is about the Icy Embrace of Winter, and I will be posting on an assortment of winter-related topics. To start my contributions off, I decided to post something I almost never do. Information about Enderra – the titular world of this blog. Enderra is host to a large pantheon; the Enderran god of Winter is Borell:

Borell
snow-flake-8God of winter, ice and snow, coldness
Personality: Grim, emotionless, stubborn
Appearance: An old man, bearded and grim and clothed in furs.
Symbol: Snowflake
Alignment: Neutral (evil tendencies)
D&D 3rd Ed. Domains: Water, Air, Winter
Preferred Weapon: Long bow

Borell is the grim lord of winter. If the world was built according to his will, then everything were to freeze over, and snow would blanket the world. Borell is constantly locked in conflict with Helion, the solar deity, and neither of the two gods can ever gain an upper hand in their struggle. The seasons are the direct result of this conflict. This means that Borell is one of the most powerful gods, as he is able to stand up to the sun god himself.

Borell is usually depicted as a grim man wearing furs of arctic animals. He wears a long bow on his back. He has gray eyes and white hair, as well as a white, thick but short beard. He is grim and bad tempered, and doesn’t acknowledge his worshipers much – although his clerics are granted spells as normal.

As a consequence, Borell doesn’t have many temples or an organized cult. Instead he is usually worshiped by hunters, savages who live in the subarctic and arctic areas, and by rural folk during the winter months. His holiday is Snowfall, which is celebrated when the first snow falls (and thus never falls on the same day). On this day, people pray to Borell and ask for a merciful – short and mild – winter.

 

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2 thoughts on “The Icy Embrace of Winter: Borell


  1. What sort of offerings are made to Borell to ease the effects of winter? Perhaps pine boughs (which make for great snowshoes), the feet of snowshoe hares, and spices like cinnamon and nutmeg. Hanging pine cones on/above your door is a sign that your home is open to travelers looking to get in out of the cold. Shutting your door to someone in need is not only extremely rude, but can invite the displeasure of Borell who will punish the inhospitable with a longer, harder winter. Borell especially enjoys unleashing and early frost to punish the worshipers of Helios who frolicked in the sun rather than prepare for the coming winter.

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