Tag Archives: Conlanguage

My next project…

NaNoWriMo is over, I won, and I am in the process of completing my novel. I decided on a project to tackle next. I could just start something completely new, but I do not want to start yet another project that never gets done. So I looked at my large collection of worlds and picked one that is dear to my heart.

Arnâron.

As you may remember, Arnâron is my version of Barsoom. I began to work on Arnâron in its current form as my project for World Building Month, back in August. (Has it only been three months? Amazing how time flies.)

When I last visited Arnâron, I was writing random articles and working on a con language. I still have a to do list with many open items. Let me re-list it here, with current status:

* Language. I made some progress, but a lot of work remains to be done.
* Religion. I have not worked on this aspect.
* Nations: Still in the same state as in August.
* Money and trade: I have posted one article on natural resources, more needs to be written.
* Cities of Arnâron. No update.
* Ruins and relics: I wrote about the ruins and the past, I think this is a solid basis to work from.
* Astrology and zodiacs: I haven’t created these at all.
* Heroes and villains: Still needs to be written.
* Prizes and princesses: Ditto.
* The hordes: Ditto, again.

Now, a lot of this is fundamental work that could simply keep me busy for years. I’d like to define some sort of goal, something that is reachable. (NaNoWriMo taught me the importance of that.)

There is one event, or story-arc, that I planned for the world, somewhat related to the basic John Carter story A Princess of Mars. I will use this event to write a series of stories, and will create all the supporting material I need for this story. I will try to write one “chapter” every month in 2009 (and into 2010 if the series does not get done in 12 months).

I have a month for outlining and for completing my NaNoWriMo novel. Let’s see how this goes.

Arnâron Language Sample

The vocabulary of my language now consists of 107 words. I have begun to create a sample translation of the story of babel.

“Now the whole earth had one language and the same words.”

X-Sampa:
dov\a Ruj wo RondoR ad mes ki yJana ut kuv\a Ruj wo peguR.

Roman: Dowa ruy wo rondor ad mes ki ûnyana ut kuwa ruy wo pegur.

Literal translation:
now everything abstract-ideas-measure-word world past-have one speech and same everything abstract-ideas-measure-word word.

Script:

Script Sample

(The line break in the script sample is after the word “ki”.)

If you think writing fifty thousand words in thirty days is hard, I dare you to create a language.

Arnâron Language: Numbers and Plurals

When I said that I don’t have numbers, I wasn’t quite correct – I do have numbers, just no symbols for them.

Numbers

| Number | X-Sampa | Latin characters |
| ————- |:————- |:————-|
| 0 | nuR | nur |
| 1 | ki | ki |
| 2 | do | do |
| 3 | Re | re |
| 4 | so | so |
|5 | at | at |
|6 | mo | mo |
|7 | na | na |
|8 | ge | ge |
|9 | ji | yi |
|10 | ksi | ksi |
|11 | ksi ki | ksi ki |
|12 | ksi do | ksi do |
|20 | doksi | doksi |
|21 | doksi ki |doksi ki |
|22 | doksi do | doksi do |
|23 | doksi Re | doksi re |
|30 | Reksi | reksi |
|40 | soksi | soksi |
|50 | aksi | aksi |
|60 | moksi | moksi |
|70 | naksi | naksi |
|80 | geksi | geksi |
|90 | jaski | jaksi |
|100 | RaJa | ranya |
|200 | do RaJa | do ranya |
|201 | do RaJa ki | do ranya ki |
|1000| zanu | zanu |
|2345| do zanu Re RaJa soski at | do zanu re ranya soski at |
|10000| ksi zanu | ksi zanu |

I originally considered using an octal number system but decided against it for two reasons. First and foremost I wanted to keep it simple, and a base-8 system isn’t the simplest solution, the decimal system is. Secondly, since the inhabitants of Arnâron are biologically humans, and they have ten fingers, they are by far most likely to develop a decimal system.

Uncountables

| X-Sampa | Latin characters | Translation |
| ————- |:————- |:————-|
| nuR | nur | none, no-one |
| kidoRe | kidore | few |
| teRat | terat | some |
| namaR | namar | enough |
| geJa | genya | many, a lot |
| Ruj | ruy | everything, everybody, all |

Plurals

The language uses measure words to form plural or to specify the number or amount of anything. There are five measure words:

| X-Sampa | Latin characters | Used for |
| ————- |:————- |:————-|
| duJa | dunya | humans |
| uRu | uru | living things |
| tai | tai | unliving things |
| Ri | ri | uncountable things |
| wo | wo |abstract ideas |

“Uncountable things” takes precedence over “living things” and “unliving things”, but not over humans or abstract ideas. For example, a crowd of humans always uses the special humans measure word, even if the number of individuals is unknown or even unknowable. On the other hand, grass is uncountable – even though you could in theory count the individual blades of grass. However, if you actually have a defined number of blades of grass, they would become countable living things. This isn’t very different from how English handles it (“grass” versus “blades of grass”).

Another example is land: Land itself is uncountable (“He owns a lot of land”), but it can be countable (“He owns two acres of land”) or even an abstract idea (“Lands of plenty.”)

The use of different measure words may also change the meaning – compare everything: Ruj Ri (“everything uncountable-things-measure-word”) and everybody: Ruj duJa (“everything humans-measure-word”).

To complicate matters further, it is possible to use the measure words in ways other than their literal meaning. For example, one could use the “living things” measure word to quantify one’s enemies. The idea expressed, of course, is that they are “less than human”; a grave insult. It is even possible to go one step further. Referring to enemy soldiers as “unliving things” even further degrades them and implies that they already lost the battle – they are as good as dead.

Context makes a lot of difference as well. For example, one could refer to oneself as a “living thing” as a means to humble oneself, or when one wants to explain that one’s life is unhappy and depressing. A soldier may describe himself as an “unliving thing”, meaning that he is a servant of his master, a tool, a weapon of war, and will serve faithfully without questioning his orders. Or he could use it to show that it is only a matter of time before he will fall in battle.

Some examples

The following are in X-Sampa and native script:

Everything
: Ruj Ri (“everything uncountable-things-measure-word”)

Everybody
: Ruj duJa (“everything humans-measure-word”)

Everywhere
: Ruj Ri doR (“everything uncountable-things-measure-word place”)

Everything – The Universe
: Ruj wo doR (“everything abstract-concepts-measure-word place”)

Two women
: do duJa jina (“Two humans-measureword woman”).

A lot of water
: geJa Ri du (“Many uncountable-things-measureword water”)

I really need more words…

Alphabet of Arnâron – Final Draft

After way too many hours spent working on it, I proudly present: the alphabet of Arnâron. I’ll call it a “final draft” because I am sure I’ll still change some things around… But I think it’s roughly in its “final” form.

As a reminder, I covered the phonemes in an earlier post.

Alphabet - Final Draft
Alphabet - Final Draft

A quick sample, “Arnâron”:

Script Sample.
Script Sample.

Unfortunately, the vocabulary of the language doesn’t suffice for a much longer text, yet. I have the basic grammar down, and I can form plurals, but I am missing numbers, future/past tense, imperative, and so on, as well as quite simply a large number of even basic words.

I’ll get there… the main issue right now is that I really want to work on culture and nations, but to do so I need the language!

Designing a language is quite hard, if you’re going at it from a complete lack of any kind of linguistic knowledge. It’s easy to throw something random together, but I find it hard to make it not suck.

In the meantime, it looks like at least two other World Building Month participantsCirellio and LeLoOr – have discovered the joy of designing languages, and I’ll follow their designs with great interest. Hey, maybe we can make week 3 of WBM “language week”? ;-)

The Script of Arnâron – Second Sample

Spent more time last night to work on the script. Current samples:

"Arnâron" in native script.
'Arnâron' in native script.

\"I think therefore I am\" in native language and script.
'I think therefore I am' in native language and script.

The first line simply reads “Arnâron”.

The second line reads “tonyo zu des ka zu” which means “I think therefore I am”.

You may notice that I flipped the “A”-triangles (/a/ and /A/ in X-Sampa) over to make for less eerie similarities. The “u” and “û” (“u” and “y” in X-Sampa) are now the two variations of the circle, while the “o” looks like a “u” – and is one of the glyphs I am really unhappy with. Same for the “ny” consonant (/J/ in X-Sampa).

I resisted the temptation to make the script right-to-left oriented, deciding I didn’t need the added headache.

The Script of Arnâron – First Sample

What’s even tougher than designing a language?

Designing the script for it.

I spent a goodly amount of time brainstorming on my alphabet today. In the end, I came up with 21 glyphs that will be the characters of the script… Except that I think they don’t really match each other stylistically. So there’s still a lot of work ahead of me. Still, I wanted to post a short sample just so that I have something to show for the many hours spent.

Script - First Sample
Script - First Sample

It reads “Arnâron”, of course.

Does it make sense that the “A” and “O” kind of look very similar to what’s in the latin alphabet? Well – the triangle and circle are just too simple to exclude them. And I figured since I’ll include them, it does make sense to use them in this way instead of confusing people by making the o-glyph stand for, say, “e”.

That said, it is very much a work in progress, and I am sure I’ll change a lot of characters around.

The First Arnâron Pronounciation Guide

Before I actually start posting details about the history of Arnâron, I though I’d give a very basic guide to the pronunciation of names and other words in the local language. Basic, because I am still very much working on their language – it doesn’t even have a final name yet – and trust me, creating a language is about the hardest thing you’ll ever do in world building, especially if you have no background in linguistics.

The list will be in the following format:

X-Sampa : Latin character : Example

Consonants

/b/ : b : English bed

/t/ : t : English stew

/k/ : k : English cat

/p/ : p : English speak

/z/ : z : English zoo

/n/ : n : English nap

/m/ : m : English mouse

/d/ : d : English dig

/s/ : s : English seem

/R/ : r : German rein

/g/ : g : English game

/J/ : ny : Spanish año, English canyon

/j/ : y : English yes, French yeux

/v\/ : w : Dutch west

Vowels

/u/ : u : English boom

/A/ : â : English father

/i/ : i : English be

/e/ : e : English met, French ses

/o/ : o : French gros

/a/ : a : French dame

/y/ : û : French tu, German über

Of course these are the basic vowels and consonants only, but since I haven’t defined too many additional rules yet this list should probably suffice for now.