Tag Archives: Design

Frontier Transport, Version 2 WIP 1

I spent way oto much time on this. Desining spaceships is hard work. Maybe once I get a bit more practice…

shipdesign-actual04

I like this new version quite a bit more than the old one. However, I am well aware of some problems with the design:

  • Need to work out bow design
  • Ship is veritcally unsymetrical – this moves center of mass “up” and will probably look shabby in 3D
  • 96 TEU cargo plan would mean that anybody who wants to pass through the cargo bay has to go through the passenger/crew level. Not a big issue, but seems inefficient.
  • How/where does the landing gear retract?

There will be more problems once I work on this again, I am sure… But well, anyway, I thought I’d share and see what you guys think.

 

 

Small Frontier Transport Spaceship

Over the past week, I’ve been playing around with a first space ship design for Somnium, a small frontier cargo/passenger transport. This is what I have so far:

Frontier Transport Spaceship
Frontier Transport Spaceship

I am sort-of happy with the design; I just wish I had better drawing skill – or better yet, knew how to use Blender so I could take this to 3D modelling.

The black boxes in the design are TEU, twenty-foot equivalent units – or in other words, the standard, ubiquitous shipping containers we all know and love. It can carry 44 of those, plus a number of passengers (probably around 20).

This is really small by ocean-shipping lines, but I always wanted the economy of the Somnium interstellar trade to be more in line with aviation than with maritime trade.

The ship is about as long as an A380 and about twice as wide as the A380 fuselage. It can carry about 1000 metric tons of cargo or about 1700 cubic meters – probably a bit more, this is based on simple multiplication for the shipping containers.

For comparison; while there is no cargo variant of the A380, a 747-400F has a maximum payload of 112 metric tons. A 747-8F has a payload of 140 metric tons.

World-Builder’s Toolchest

I use the following for my worldbuilding:

Software!

  • LibreOffice – Free, cross-platform, can export PDF – what more do I want?
  • PagePlus X6 – Ah, yes. A (relatively) inexpensive software that handles layout (relatively) well
  • Inkscape – For vector drawing (mostly maps but also some diagrams)
  • FreeMap – For mind-mapping
  • The Gimp – Bitmap graphics editing (the background for my star map was made with this, for example)
  • Subversion – for creating backups; any other solution will do as long as you have one that actually works.
  • Google Earth – For reference, and for testing out my maps on a sphere!

Alternatives:

  • If you have enough money (or can get it inexpensively, say, on a student’s discount) the Adobe creative suite might be a better substitute for some of the above, but I am not wealthy enough to buy them.
  • MS Office is an adequate replacement for LibreOffice, and OpenOffice is a decent replacement.

Websites!

  • Well, anything from my link sections really – Plus Wikipedia.
  • News websites like the BBC or CNN or Google News are the best sources for plot ideas ever invented. A newspaper will do, too, if you are stuck in the mid-20th Century.
  • WordPress for blogging. Other blog providers will work too, pick what you are comfortable with, but personally I can recommend WP.
  • Cartographers’ Guild is worth its weight in gold and then some.

Physical Tools!

  • Lots of paper for sketching out ideas and taking notes – sometimes a quick diagram with a pencil is the best way to work on something, because it frees you from distractions
  • Binders into which I sort those, plus “WIP” printouts of maps and so on. Never throw anything away that you might use at a later time.
  • Cheap inkjet printer/scanner for WIP prints and for scanning stuff if I need to. Will replace this with a cheap color laser/scanner combo device as soon as I have the spare money for it.
  • Small Wacom Bamboo tablet (buy the largest tablet you can afford and can fit on your desk if you intend to do graphics or mapping at all. Trust me. You will never look back.)
  • Tons of reference books – A lot of expert knowledge is not or not easily accessible in digital form yet, and books often contain a lot of photos and other pictures as well that you won’t easily find online. Do not be afraid to check out the kids/teenagers’ section – those books are lighter on the details, but usually contain a lot of cool pictures.

Other stuff!

  • I use the “post it” notes function of my iPhone to take notes on world-building when I am on the road, then email them to myself every now and then.
  • Write down everything, every idea you have – every cool name you hear – even if it’s just individual words or one-liners. Sort them at home – I have several huge collections of ideas, name lists, and so on.
  • Make backups of everything! – My PC has 2 Harddrives that run as a Raid 1 (meaning if one dies, the other still contains all data) plus all my data is in a subversion repository that I synchronize securely to a server in a datacenter in Bavaria. If you don’t want to – or can’t – run your own infrastructure, there are plenty of cloud storage providers nowadays. Just make sure you are comfortable entrusting your documents to a third party – read their terms & conditions carefully.
  • Always respect copyright. Don’t use what you do not have explicit permission to use. This is both out of respect for the original author, but also because of copyright laws – breaking them can get you into hot water nowadays. When in doubt, ask your lawyer (and I am not kidding). When I collect stuff for inspiration (images, text, etc) I always save a plain text file with the same name as the work itself (but with a .txt extension) which notes author, source URL, and what license the work was released under. That way, when I go back to it months later, I know if I can put it on my blog or not, for example.
  • Whatever office suite you get, learn to use it. Use styles instead of manually formatting, automatic table of contents, foot- and end-notes, and so on. You will spend a lot of time in there; make your documents the cleanest to use you can. You will thank yourself later.
  • I am not a fan of fractal map generators. The maps they create look cool at first glance, but they are decidedly not natural, and this breaks suspension of disbelief quickly.

What do you guys use? Any tools or software you use that’s not on the list?

Lego Design #3: Tiny Beach

Third (and, I promise, for now final) Lego design: A tiny beach scene. This is as small as you can go with Lego bricks and still set up some meaningful scenery. This is a popular beach at the blue ocean. The surf’s perfect today – waves crashing on the yellow sand of the beach. There’s a road connecting a lighthouse, two hotel highrises – complete with swimming pool – and a vacation home. The inland is covered in lush vegetation.

Shakespeare and Dragons Podcast

Sometimes you find gems when you least expect it. I was actually looking for a good domain name to use for this weblog when I came across this world-building podcast.

Shakespeare & Dragons [dead link!] is run by Paul Stark. Paul is an English teacher from California with aspirations to becoming a professional world builder. He takes a story-based approach to building worlds, which is a little different from the usual “scientific” approach to Conworlds.

Paul has published 15 episodes so far (plus a “donation reward” special dealing with monster design). Unfortunately, his publishing schedule is very irregular, but what’s already available is quite interesting and really worth the time to download: If you’re a world-builder, this podcast is two thumbs up. But even regular game masters can take a lot of value from it, as they will have to create stories just the same. Highly recommended. And do send Paul some feedback, so he is motivated enough to continue working on the podcast.

Update, 2011-09-16: It appears the website is now gone as well. The episodes are still out there, I will create a page to access them more easily.

Update, 2015-11-26: Never revisited the post, I got permission from Paul to host the podcast’s archive.